Civil War Set: II

Monocacy-Best-Farm

Monocacy: the Battle of Save Washington

Monocacy

Prior to the battle of Monocacy, the Best farm had been one of the largest slave-owners in central MD. With the advance party of Gen Jubal A Early arriving to march his troops down the Georgetown Pike and into the Capital, this farm was the point from which thousands of Confederate troops massed for the attack on Washington. During the night US Gen. US Grant sent thousands of troops to man the forts around Washington DC, and the attack failed. CS Gen. Jubal A Early’s troops withdrew across the Potomac to Virginia.
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Grants-Cabin

Grant’s Cabin

Grant's Cabin

This small cabin was where Gen US Grant lived during the 10-month siege of Petersburg. It had two rooms, one of which was a bedroom while the other was where he received visitors. After the war, the cabin was put on display at the 1896 World’s Fair in Chicago, later taken down and put into storage. What stands here today is largely a replica, as parts of the original cabin were lost.
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Fort-Sumter

Fort Sumter Skies

Fort Sumter

Fort Sumter, located at the mouth of Charleston Bay, was where the first shots were fired in the Civil War. The US had a skeleton crew of soldiers and sailors manning the fort under repair, and the Confederates fired on the fort from nearby Fort Moultrie. This caused the US occupants to flee during the night by rowing out to the US Navy fleet. This fleet later reduced the fort to rubble with an artillery barrage to prevent its use by the Confederates.
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Fort-Cobun

Fort Cobun on the Mississippi

Fort Cobun

In the 1850-60’s, the meandering Mississippi took a turn away from the fort and the town of Grand Gulf and carved out a new channel five miles away. This left the busy port of Grand Gulf and the guns of its nearby protective Fort Cobun, high and dry.
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Edwards-ferry

Fords over the Potomac

Edwards Ferry

Edwards Ford was one of more than a dozen fords across the Potomac from Great Falls to Shepherdstown. During the Civil War these fords played a great part in prisoner exchanges, infiltration of agents from one side to the other, smuggling of goods from North or South, transfer of spies, etc. Troops stationed at the fords could do little to prevent the traffic.
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Drewrys-Bluff

Drewry’s Bluff Blockade

Drewry's Bluff

Drewry’s Bluff played an important part in keeping the James clear of US gunboats seeking to attack Richmond from the South. This battery and others nearby could fire on vessels up to a mile or more away.
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City-Point-pier

City Point Pier

City-Point-pier

From 1863-65, the City Point pier and the James River Roads was a quartermaster corps storage facility for supplies and weapons needed to maintain the siege of Petersburg. Today it looks serene and peaceful, but in the 1860’s this waterway was among the busiest in the world.
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Antietam-Cornfield-Lane

Cornfield Lane

Antietam-Cornfield-Lane

Attacks and counterattacks shifted back and forth around the cornfield near the Dunker Church near dawn. Union attacks eventually sliced through the Confederate lines, but the strong attack was not followed up with further action. Antietam has the single highest casualty toll of any Civil War battle, with the total number of dead, wounded or missing standing at 22,717 for one day.
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